Mayo Clinic gives Coenzyme Q 10 an “A”

The prestigious Mayo Clinic regularly reviews dietary supplements, then grades them according to the evidence that they actually

Mayo Clinic Plummer Building (seen from Mayo B...

Mayo Clinic gives Coenzyme Q 10 an A

work.

Their grading system is:

A Strong scientific evidence for this use
B Good scientific evidence for this use
C Unclear scientific evidence for this use
D Fair scientific evidence against this use (it may not work)
F Strong scientific evidence against this use (it likely does not work)

We are pleased that the Mayo Clinic gives an “A” for coenzyme Q supplements in the event of a deficiency in coenzyme Q. According to the Mayo Clinic,

Coenzyme Q10 is normally produced by the human body, although deficiency may occur in patients with impaired CoQ10 biosynthesis due to severe metabolic or mitochondrial disorders, not enough dietary CoQ10 intake, or too much CoQ10 use by the body. Depending on the cause of CoQ10 deficiency, supplementation or increased dietary intake of CoQ10 and the vitamins and minerals needed to produce CoQ10 may be effective.

Since statins are a well-known cause of coenzyme Q 10 deficiency, physicians are increasingly encouraging their statin patients to take a high-quality coenzyme Q 10 supplement while on the statin.

Are you taking a prescription statin to lower your cholesterol? If so, we also urge you to take a coenzyme Q 10 supplement.

But we also urge you to avoid the cheap, supermarket brands.

Why? Because coenzyme Q 10 is a difficult vitamin to work with. It’s not as simple as packing “pure” coenzyme Q 10 into a capsule.

Coenzyme Q 10 needs help to get it from the capsule into your circulation. This is why the better formulas have extra ingredients to carry coenzyme Q 10 into the circulation.

Without that help, the cheap product you’re using may not work. It’s that simple.

So, if you’re on a statin, please take a coenzyme Q 10 supplement. But, be very careful in choosing one!

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